What We Do:

Bind is Newcastle’s not-for-profit food waste hub that believes in positive, creative approaches to reduce food waste and drive behaviour change. We focus our work on changing public attitudes, education, local policy and collaborating with local private, public and third sector organisations to deliver consistent, effective projects to reduce food waste.

BIND 6.jpg
 
_MG_0133.jpg
 
 

Food waste is one of the biggest contributors to climate change. It exacerbates food inequalities and wreaks havoc with the economy. It's one of the biggest environmental and social challenges we face on the planet. We love food so much, we simply can’t bare to see it get wasted. We see preventing food waste as a unique opportunity to save money whilst helping the planet, and through enjoying food we can engage people to make real change.

Bind also supports several projects which use surplus food in creative ways to engage the general public in the issue. To find out more about our projects - see our home page.


Whilst food waste redistribution channels continue to improve in Newcastle and beyond, there remains a distinct lack of work in source prevention, despite this being the top priority in the food waste hierarchy.

 
Food_and_Drink_hierarchy.jpg
 
 

Strategic/policy: We ensure that messages and actions that follow the food waste hierarchy are integrated into local policy, and acted upon. Whilst food waste redistribution channels continue to improve in Newcastle and beyond, there remains a distinct lack of work in source prevention, despite this being the top priority in the food waste hierarchy.

Education and awareness raising: The first step in changing behaviour is to make people aware of the problem. Raising awareness on the causes and effects of food waste is the first thing we do in all our interventions.

Prevention: Whether we’re working with individuals, schools, businesses or whole cities the process of food waste prevention is always the same: measure it, create an action plan, implement changes,  measure again and evaluate. This process should be repeated several times, and the simplest changes are almost always the most effective.

Redistribution: Surplus food will always be inevitable. We all have a responsibility to make sure that when surplus food does arise, it is eaten by people and not wasted.  We achieve this through establishing, promoting and maintaining food surplus redistribution channels.